Vegan Family Guide

London Children's Map

Plant based baby bants.  Top tips for vegan children, their parents or guardians.  London little one map of fun.

Shakspeare Walk, Stoke Newington, London, N16

Islington and Hackney Vegan Families group

EC AT NURSERY

elimination communication/ natural infant hygiene

This article follows on from the Baby Led Potty Training Article, which describes how we toilet trained our baby from two months old.  Here I will consider how providers in childcare settings could apply some of the principles.  This is based on my memories of working in nurseries and reading.      

https://thegreenparent.co.uk/articles/read/nappy-free-living

“When my daughter started daycare at age two, she was pretty toilet independent,” remembers Rachel. “The staff at the nursery were delighted that they didn’t have to put any work into toilet training her, as this was quite a heavy part of their workload for the other two- to three-year-olds. They quickly grasped the concepts of EC and have said that they would happily support younger children being ECed in their care.”    

http://www.realnappiesforlondon.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/NIH.pdf

It may just require a bit more time to help the caregiver understand the principle and to support them in learning. Fortunately the practice of NIH is now becoming more widespread and has received increasing media attention, so more caregivers will have heard of it. Also, childcare providers have a duty under the ‘National Standards for Under 8’s day care and childminding’ (Dept. of Education and Skills – DfES 2003) to provide equal opportunities (National Standard 9) to every child in their care, so if a parent would like to continue with NIH then the care provider should support this (National Standard 12). If you would like to view this document details can be found in the reference section.

Bathroom Tiles
 

BABY LED POTTY AND TOILET TRAINING

 

Key Person

If there is a caregiver that your child generally responds well to, ask this person to be “in charge” of the potty training responsibilities for your child at daycare, as much as possible.This person should be the one to take your child to the potty each time, should be the one watching for your child's signals, and also paying attention to your child in case there is an accident, then calmly helping your child to potty and get cleaned-up.If there is a caregiver that your child generally responds well to, ask this person to be “in charge” of the potty training responsibilities for your child at daycare, as much as possible.This person should be the one to take your child to the potty each time, should be the one watching for your child's signals, and also paying attention to your child in case there is an accident, then calmly helping your child to potty and get cleaned-up.     

  • paying special attention to the potty-training child for the first week or two,

  • initiating frequent potty breaks, (I like to suggest every hour, or whenever the teachers usually change diapers if it's not too spread apart - Andrea)

 https://godiaperfree.com/successful-potty-training-with-your-daycare/   

https://www.bornready.uk/blog/how-to-help-your-toddler-avoid-chronic-constipation/

Try to ensure that your child: Knows who to ask when they need to use the potty. Knows how to ask to use the potty

Working with parents

  • asking parents to provide many changes of clothes, and, finally,

  • allowing children to use CLOTH training pants, if that is working well for the child at home. (Alternatively, some kids really need to have nothing but pants on their bums “commando” for the first 2 to 4 weeks of potty-training in order to get the hang of it. See what the center will allow.)  https://godiaperfree.com/successful-potty-training-with-your-daycare/     

  • https://www.verywellfamily.com/how-to-potty-train-a-child-in-daycare-616859Be as Consistent as Possible- same potty as at home

  • Quick changable clothes advise parents   https://www.bornready.uk/blog/how-to-help-your-toddler-avoid-chronic-constipation/Is familiar with the setting. Take them to the toilet when you arrive and before you leave. Let them get used to using the toilet with you there so that you both know the set-up.
    This also means you’ll watch your child use the facilities and know if anything else is throwing them. Are the toilets too high? Can they reach the paper? Do they need to ask for help to wipe or will they be spotted and assisted? Are they worried about the doors?   If you’re pottying and your nursery / daycare isn’t well geared up for ec, bring in your own potty or adapter seat (the same model as you have at home). Help your child to use it in the nappy changing cupboard or wherever it’s going to live. Familiarise them with the set-up so that they know what to expect.  Has time at the beginning and end of the day to poo at home!  https://static1.squarespace.com/static/59881e0a15d5dba84b6e21de/t/59d71661e3df282e4e6e8321/1507268195934/EC+Brochure.pdf  arriving and leaving   If
you
find
a
day
care
provider
or
nanny
who
has
not
used
EC
before,
but
is
open
to
it,
be
certain
to
give
 them
 sufficient
 training
 before
 letting
 them
 potty
 your
 baby
 on
 their
 own.
 Ask
 your
 nanny
 or
 other
 caregiver
 to
 jot
 down
 the
 times
 your
 baby
 goes
 during
 their
 care.
 This
 can
 help
 you
establish
 or
 better
 follow
baby's
elimination
patterns
and
natural
 timing,
as
well
as
give
you
an
indication
of
how
well
your
 nanny
is
doing
with
your
baby
and
EC

Routine reminders

Regular intervals of 20 to 30 minutes https://hintmama.com/2014/02/11/todays-hint-the-russian-secret-to-early-potty-training/     

http://www.metrokids.com/MetroKids/January-2010/Many-Day-Cares-Aid-Potty-Training/

Children thrive on routine, such as reliable, scheduled potty breaks, says Wallen-Fort. Because of that routine, “most children are potty trained at day care before they are trained at home.”   https://godiaperfree.com/how-to-send-your-young-toddler-to-preschool-without-diapers-daycare/I told them to take him at transition times, as if he were a 2 or 3 year old who was potty training still.

Positive reinforcement

Staff ratios and turnover

Look of concentration or seriousness

Still and quiet- lets you get on with housework

Appears strangely independent and focussed on an activity

Subtle bum wiggle

Stands holding something

Hasn't gone to sleep when expected

Had a feed recently

Has been distracted when out (Baby likes to go at home)

Has just been and you think they couldn't possibly need to go again

Says poo

I view working out when Baby wants the toilet as a mindfulness practice which has brought us closer overall, but at times to tears. 

Privacy and safeguarding

https://godiaperfree.com/how-to-send-your-young-toddler-to-preschool-without-diapers-daycare/

 told the teachers that he (and most kiddos) does not like when someone is sitting right next to them, holding them or protecting them on the toilet. Most prefer you to turn your back, wash your hands, talk to someone else, etc.  

https://www.ndna.org.uk/NDNA/Community/myNDNA/Mini_Guides/Intimate_and_safe_care_and_practice.aspx?WebsiteKey=5e278c52-0dec-4482-ad81-d06b25949f8b

Ensure intimate care such as nappy changing and toileting, or changing wet clothes is carried out one-to-one by a child’s key person wherever possible, staying visible to other practitioners but maintaining a child’s privacy, for example, leaving the door ajar.

Equipment

Hygiene

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/10901020903084330

All toilets and sinks, however, are child-sized. Due to the high number of children, every classroom has squat toilets (a type of toilet that does not have seating) instead of regular toilets so it does not need to be cleaned frequently. In many classrooms for 2- to 3-year-olds, training potties are used on a regular basis. This does pose a health concern, even though staff pay great attention to health and safety practices by employing a separate assistant who is responsible for routine care like cleaning tables before and after lunch, toilets, and monitoring hand washing      

https://godiaperfree.com/successful-potty-training-with-your-daycare/

Clothes

Breaks and bad days

Some days there is too much going on, or one of us is tired, and Baby and I fall out of sync.  There have also been longer phases when we stopped understanding one another.  For example, when Baby learnt to crawl they were very busy and found it hard to multi task.  I had to learn to spot the signs without being in physical contact.  Other phases were when baby started eating, and when we moved house.  
As they have got older, Baby has had more things to say and I sometimes misinterpret the signal as asking for something else.
There was another phase where Baby only wanted me to take them to the toilet, and would simply not go if someone else tried.  They may have even sat there giggling.

Flappy times

Sometimes Baby isn't into it.  At these times it is more common that they do need to go than that they don't.  They sometimes get in a flap while waiting to be brought.  Here are some things I do to address this:

Offer a boob

Go myself to set an example

Change the position, ie toilet seat reducer or ec hold

Hold over a sink in front of a distracting mirror

Give up and suggest a nap instead

Accept that I misinterpreted the situation

If Baby struggles with a poo, the ec hold can be good to squeeze it out.  Or I leave them to go in the nappy at their convenience.

LINKS